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When we talk about major concerns facing LGBTQ youth, we typically discuss topics like bias-based bullying and harassment or familial rejection and homelessness; and when we talk about violence facing the larger LGBTQ community, we typically discuss hate crimes.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

Additionally, during the 12 months before the survey, 1 in 10 teens reported they had been kissed, touched, or physically forced to have sexual intercourse when they did not want to at least once by someone they were dating.

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February is National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month Dating violence can happen to any teen in a romantic, dating, or sexual relationship, anytime, anywhere. Learn how to prevent teen dating violence and to promote healthy relationships with CDC's online resources.

Did you know that in a recent national survey, 1 in 10 teens reported being hit or physically hurt on purpose by a boyfriend or girlfriend at least once in the 12 months before the survey?

You may think that behaviors like calling you names or insisting on seeing you all the time are a "normal" part of relationships.

But they can lead to more serious kinds of abuse, like hitting, stalking, or preventing you from using birth control.

CARE provides violence prevention education for the entire UCSD campus and offers free and confidential services for students, staff and faculty impacted by sexual assault, relationship violence and stalking.*All communications with users of CARE services are privileged and confidential under California Evidence Code Sections 1010-1027, 1035..2.

Last modified 10-Aug-2019 18:27